The influences of knowledge of HIV/AIDS and self-esteem on the sexual practices of college students

Main Article Content

Danielle S. Hollar
William E. Snizek
Cite this article:  Hollar, D., & Snizek, W. (1996). The influences of knowledge of HIV/AIDS and self-esteem on the sexual practices of college students. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 24(1), 75-86.


Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments
Author Contact

Using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical starting point, the present study extends previous research on health protective behavior by exploring the relationship among knowledge, self-esteem and students’ proclivity to engage in risky sexual behavior. To test the Model, data were analyzed from a sample of undergraduate students at a large land-grant university. Results indicate that students with high levels of self-esteem, as well as high levels of knowledge of HIV/AIDS, report engaging in safer behavioral practices, for the non- conventional sexual behaviors, more so than those with low and moderate levels of self-esteem. With respect to those more conventional sexual behavioral practices, such as unprotected vaginal/penile intercourse and unprotected sex with multiple sex partners, those with high self-esteem surprisingly reported more risky sexual behaviors than those with low and moderate self-esteem. These results indicate that both self-esteem and knowledge operate differently depending on the type of sexual behavior involved – conventional or nonconventional. Such differences need to be taken into account when using the Health Belief Model in evaluating HIV/AIDS protective behavior among US college students.


Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.

Article Details

© 1996 Scientific Journal Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.