Perceived social influence in mental health: The professionals' perspective

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Greg J. Neimeyer
Curtis Walling
Cite this article:  Neimeyer, G., & Walling, C. (1990). Perceived social influence in mental health: The professionals' perspective. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 18(2), 217-224.


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The response to a national survey of mental health professionals, 25 clinical psychologists, 36 counseling psychologists, 20 psychiatrists, and 21 social workers (N = 102) rated their own and each of the other groups along the Counselor Rating Form (Barak & Lacrosse, 1977). Results indicated that counseling psychologists and social workers were viewed as more attractive but less expert than clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, and that clinical psychologists, counseling psychologists, and social workers were viewed as more trustworthy than psychiatrists. Interactions along each of the three variables, however, qualified the findings. For instance, in no case did any professional group rate another as significantly more attractive, trustworthy or expert than itself, suggesting the operation of an ingroup-outgroup bias.
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