Sex differences in perceived self- and other-disclosure: A case where inequity increases satisfaction

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Karen U. Millar
Murray G. Millar
Cite this article:  Millar, K., & Millar, M. (1988). Sex differences in perceived self- and other-disclosure: A case where inequity increases satisfaction. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 16(1), 59-64.


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Using a diary technique, sex differences in persons’ perceptions of self and other-disclosure were examined. It was hypothesized that satisfaction in dating relationships is associated not with strict reciprocity in personal exchanges, but with the relative amount of disclosure perceived to be exchanged between the partners. Specifically, couples in a dating interaction will report greater satisfaction when the exchange is perceived to follow traditional sex-typed norms. Fifty-five participants monitored their own dating interactions over a 2-week period. Results indicated that males reported less interaction satisfaction if, relative to their date, they perceived themselves disclosing more personal information. The reverse tended to be true for females.


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